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Heroic volunteer a true role model

April 21, 2010

 

Leave a message of condolence for Wong Fuk-wing’s family here

 

Truck driver Wong Fuk-wing, 46, died trying to save earthquake victims on the mainland. He was rescuing people at an orphanage in Yushu . He managed to save three children and a staff member. But when he returned to save others, there was an aftershock. He was seriously hurt, and he died  an hour later.

It was not the first time Wong had  helped those in need. In 2002, he  took part in a charity walk from Hong Kong to Beijing and raised more than 200,000 yuan (HK$227,060) for Red Cross in China. Two years ago, he volunteered  to deliver relief supplies after a much bigger earthquake hit Sichuan.

The series of earthquakes that hit the Yushu Tibetan autonomous prefecture in Qinghai province  killed more than 400 people and injured 10,000. They were mostly students and teachers.

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9 Comments leave one →
  1. May 6, 2010 12:42 pm

    Heroic act

    Jacqueline Siu, Hang Seng School of Commerce

    I am proud of Wong Fuk-wing who sacrificed his life trying to save victims of the Qinghai earthquake.

    He was just an ordinary truck driver working on his own initiative, but he saved several lives. He has shown that everyone can help others regardless of their ability, and be a hero.

    Wong suffered from ill-health but still insisted on being a volunteer. We should praise his kindness and sincerity.

  2. Donna permalink
    April 25, 2010 11:32 pm

    QUAKE

    Quietly broke the break
    Urgently saved the souls
    A thoudsand people
    Killed in the
    Earth’s destruction

  3. Walter permalink
    April 24, 2010 10:17 pm

    I think he is so sorrowful. His selflessness impresses all the Hongkongers.
    He is really our hero. As I knew, he did escape from the disaster. He tried his
    very best to help others so that the debris buried him. I really admire him.
    I hope that we should also try to be more generous. Though we might not
    have courage to save others, at least we can donate more money to help the
    poor.

  4. April 22, 2010 11:27 am

    By Jocelyn Wong Hey-ming, Young Post Student Reporter

    I have studied some basic neurobiology. Altruism was one of the words I came across.

    I knew animals such as non-breeding mole rats sacrifice their lives to provide the best conditions for their queen to reproduce. I have also heard of people sacrificing their lives to save their children in times of crisis. This kind of concern for one another in a family is natural.

    But local truck driver Wong Fuk-Wing (Ah-Fuk) sacrificed his life to save others. I’m overwhelmed by his action. He is the epitome of altruism and an honourable humanitarian. On April 13, Wong was volunteering at an orphanage in Yushu, Qinghai province when an earthquake struck the area. He saved four people, but died while trying to save others. He is a true hero.

    • April 22, 2010 11:27 am

      Wong’s actions remind us that when we need to we can do great things. Once again students have born the brunt of an earthquake on the mainland. Many of them had lucky escapes, like the student who liked to sleep in and was still in the dormitory when the quake struck. Others have also had to be heroes. Gengsong Daiji, 16, used her bare hands to dig nine members of her family from the rubble. Even though she was surrounded by so much hardship, Gengsong Daiji didn’t complain. “We’re alive and that’s the main thing,” she said. “All I want to do now is get back to school.”

      Many students’ lives have been shattered. They have lost limbs, homes and friends. Our heart goes out to them.

      Susan, Editor

  5. April 21, 2010 3:18 pm

    By Henry Chan, Hang Seng School of Commerce

    Aftershocks are as dangerous as the earthquake and everyone knows there
    is a risk of rescuing the kids out of the building. If aftershock
    occurred in the time when Wong saved the kids, there is a high chance he
    would be killed by falling bricks. Very unfortunately, he could not
    escape from the building.

    I’m very much impressed by what he actually did: He didn’t know those
    kids. He wouldn’t have been accused of being cool-blooded just because
    he didn’t rescue the kids. He knows perfectly well the rescue work is
    not risk-free; and that is impressive enough because sacrificing himself
    in an attempt to save others is for sure not an easy decision to make.

    At his golden age, he still can enjoy his life in the following decades.
    What he chose to do in the rest of his life was to be a volunteer – what
    he can do is of course limited, but it’s definitely priceless.

    Perhaps it is time to do some reflection: do we live just for ourselves?
    Have we done our best and most? If not, shouldn’t we follow what Mr.
    Wong has done – be a volunteer?

  6. April 21, 2010 3:15 pm

    By Queenie Wong, Hang Seng School of Commerce

    In Hong Kong, most of us only focus on our own business, and not
    willing to concern about the others. The selfless contribution of
    Fuk-wing is telling us to pay more attendion on the happenings of the
    others and try our very best to help them. I hope all Hong Kong people
    can learn their lesson from this incident and make Fu-wing’s death
    meaningful.

  7. April 21, 2010 1:30 pm

    By Wingky Ma, Hang Seng School of Commerce

    Wong’s name will be engraved in everyone’s mind. His bravery is beyond imagination. Living in a blessed city like Hong Kong, we do not even think about natural disasters which kill thousands of people every year all over the world.

    We should really appreciate the work of volunteers who risk their lives to save others. They are true role models for the younger generation.

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